Q&A: What About Overpopulation?

This question comes up a lot.  On the surface, it seems to make sense: we want future generations to be able to enjoy this lovely earth and all the wonders of nature, without overcrowding and destroying the place.  Thus, we shouldn’t create more people than will fit on the earth.

Before considering the topic of overpopulation itself, let’s just correct one assumption in that statement.  Often people see abortion as a preventative measure, to stop population growth before it happens.  The problem with this is that the unborn child already exists.  It’s too late to prevent anything: he or she is nestled happily in the womb, chilling out in the amniotic fluid while his/her cells multiply at an amazing rate.  So what is really being advocated here is killing humans in order to make the world better for the ones who are already grown.  Do you think someone could use overpopulation as a justification for killing a seven-year-old?  Why, then, is it a good reason to kill an unborn child?

If you really want to get into a discussion about overpopulation, Steve Mosher has a wonderful collection of videos.  This video highlights the fact that many countries are now below replacement rate, meaning that people aren’t having enough children to replace the current generation.  As we see already in China, this puts immense pressure on the younger generation to support a huge amount of retirees, and reduces the young workforce, problems that will only be magnified in future generations.

China’s one-child policy, intended to alleviate overpopulation and crowding, has had other devastating effects.  Forced abortion has been taking place there for decades.  Government officials routinely abduct women who are seven, eight, even nine months pregnant, and take them to hospitals where they are forced to have abortions against their will.  ‘Family Planning Officials’ get monetary rewards for limiting births, so the practice is not likely to end soon.  Human rights activist Chen Guangcheng drew attention to this in his village, and was swiftly put under house arrest by the Chinese Government.  Even Batman couldn’t save the day: when actor Christian Bale tried to visit Chen and show his support, plainclothes police officers physically prevented him from entering the village.  Even if Steve Mosher hasn’t convinced you that overpopulation is a myth, surely you can agree that killing children – especially using the Chinese government’s draconian methods – is not a good solution.

 

 

This entry was posted in Q&A and tagged , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

3 Responses to Q&A: What About Overpopulation?

  1. Elizabeth Ann says:

    Overpopulation strikes me as a grasping-at-straws argument for
    abortion, and one that is frightening in its coldness toward mankind.
    One wonders if those who put forward this argument have really thought
    through what it means. Men are playing at being gods of this earth,
    and the results are exactly as distressing as one would expect,
    considering the depth of human frailty. The God of the Bible – the
    God of all creation, who bestows on us the blessing of life from
    generation to generation – can be trusted to keep things well in hand.
    But we fail to trust Him, and instead we reject His gifts and His
    wisdom and decide for ourselves what is best. This, to me, is the
    heart of the overpopulation argument. Abortion is far from being the
    answer, and I wonder if more focus needs to be put on the fundamental
    question itself: Why do we believe that we are in a position to
    regulate the size of the human population by any means? How
    frightening it must be to believe that we alone hold the ultimate fate
    of the earth in our hands, without the everlasting presence,
    unchanging love and infallible wisdom of the Creator of all.

  2. Kyle David says:

    Dear Elizabeth Ann,
    “The God of the Bible – the
    God of all creation, who bestows on us the blessing of life from
    generation to generation – can be trusted to keep things well in hand.
    But we fail to trust Him, and instead we reject His gifts and His
    wisdom and decide for ourselves what is best. This, to me, is the
    heart of the overpopulation argument. Abortion is far from being the
    answer, and I wonder if more focus needs to be put on the fundamental
    question itself: Why do we believe that we are in a position to
    regulate the size of the human population by any means? How
    frightening it must be to believe that we alone hold the ultimate fate
    of the earth in our hands, without the everlasting presence,
    unchanging love and infallible wisdom of the Creator of all.”
    This is a website dedicated to pro-life, not a church. If you really want to convince pro-choice people to stop promoting abortion, don’t use The Bible as a source. Not everyone is religious, let alone Christian. When you tell atheists, or any non-Christian that the God you believe in doesn’t like what they are doing, it means nothing. For all they care you told them that your imaginary friend says to stop abortion, and that your imaginary friend is super strong so you better listen to him. They don’t believe in your God, so they don’t recognize Him as an authority they must trust and follow. You need to give arguments that work even if they don’t believe in God, otherwise you’ll get nowhere with them. Shouting at an atheist with arguments from the bible will do about as much as doing the same to a brick wall.

    I don’t think abortion should be used as a form of population control, and I agree that everyone should see using abortion in this way as terrible. Don’t cite Leviticus, or Numbers, instead cite peer reviewed journals on the harm abortion causes. That is the proof that atheist pro-choicers will listen to, and so long as they stop promoting abortion, who cares what sources changes their mind?

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *